20% Rise in Insulin Use by 2030, Study Says

98 million Indians will suffer from diabetes by 2030, says Study

Millions of diabetics could be left without insulin by 2030

As the number of people with diabetes soars, the growing demand for insulin will result in a shortfall for the drug, CNN has reported, citing findings from a new study. Type 2 diabetes is associated with obesity, poor diet, and physical inactivity.

According to World Health Organization (WHO), India had 69.2 million people living with diabetes in 2015.

By the year 2030, 511 million adults around the world will have type 2 diabetes and 79 million of them will need insulin to manage their condition.

By 2030, an estimated 79 million adults with Type 2 diabetes are expected to need insulin. They estimated the number of people with type 2 diabetes who would need to use insulin for the next 12 years.


Sanjay Basu, assistant professor of medicine at Stanford University and who led the study, said: "Despite the UN's commitment to treat noncommunicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily hard for patients to access".

Insulin treatment is costly, and the worldwide insulin market is presently dominated by only three major manufacturers.

The study says that the demand for insulin is likely to rise by 20% by 2030, and the lack of availability will subsequently put patients at risk of developing complications.

"Despite the UN's commitment to treat non-communicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily hard for patients to access".


It should be also noted that about 33 million people now do not have access to insulin.

Projection Stanford University researchers developed a microsimulation of type 2 diabetes management from 2018-2030 across 221 countries using data from the International Diabetes Federation. "Despite the UN's commitment to treat non-communicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily hard for patients to access", said Dr Sanjay Basu, a scientist at the Stanford University and the lead author of the study, Eurekalert.org reported.

In 2016 an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that the drug's price nearly tripled between 2002 and 2013.

While governments continue to encourage healthier lifestyles to prevent type 2 diabetes, the authors of the study also hope for initiatives to make life-changing insulin available and affordable.


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