Fresh grounds for coffee: Study shows it may boost longevity

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On the basis of this study, some people who were holding back on coffee because of lingering health concerns may want to drink a little more if they want to, professor Lichstenstein says.

This recent study drew from data from the UK Biobank study, an in-depth research initiative collecting data and following 500,000 people for three decades. But the existing literature, including meta-analyses aggregating dozens of coffee studies involving millions of people, do show some notable associations between people who report drinking more coffee and protective effects against cardiovascular disease (the number one killer of Americans) like heart disease and stroke. Overall, coffee drinkers were about 10-15 percent less likely to die than coffee abstainers.

The lower risk of death held true with both caffeinated and decaf coffee, leading researchers to believe the value of coffee lies in the beans.

It's the first large study to suggest a benefit even in people with genetic glitches affecting how their bodies use caffeine.

It includes about half a million Brits who contributed their data and DNA to the United Kingdom biobank, and it finds an inverse relationship between people drinking up to eight or more cups per day and all-cause mortality.


As all this data shows, coffee is likely beneficial for most of us, and at the very least not harmful.

Your habit of guzzling coffee throughout the day could be the secret to a longer life. But she said the results reinforce previous research and add additional reassurance for coffee drinkers.

The latest study, published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, reveals that people who drink more coffee have a lower risk of death even if they drink eight or more cups per day, and even if their genetics make them slow to process caffeine.

Moreover, to get the benefit, it didn't matter whether someone metabolized caffeine slowly or quickly.

But coffee drinkers in the study didn't have higher risks than non-drinkers of dying from heart disease and other blood pressure-related causes. A 2014 study found that there was zero evidence of dehydration with moderate daily coffee intake. It covered almost half a million people, for a start, which is definitely to its credit.


The inverse association with mortality continued right up to eight cups of coffee a day, suggesting we shouldn't worry too much about overdoing our coffee consumption.

Enigma Cafe staff member Clarke Gardiner said coffee for him was "the essence of energy to wake up in the morning", drinking multiple coffees every day at work - including at night time.

So is all of the glowing research around coffee consumption scientifically sound, or yet another case of over-hyped public health reporting lacking nuance?

People should also be aware that some people have a physical sensitivity to coffee.


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